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Filet Mignon with Herb Butter

filet-mignon
<article itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Recipe"> <section itemprop="description"> <p>Restaurant meals seem so decadent, we often think it takes a trained chef to prepare them. In reality, some of the most sumptuous classic dishes only take a little bit of kitchen know-how and some basic techniques. It’s the ingredients that make all the difference! First, choose a great cut of top-quality, grass-fed beef. Then treat it to some simple seasoning Finally, finish it off with a flavor bomb of buttery goodness and you have a meal to remember! Best of all, this date-night dream takes only 15 minutes from start to finish.</p> </section> <section> <header>What Is the Difference Between Beef Tenderloin and Filet Mignon?</header> <p>Some people, especially in America, refer to beef tenderloin and filet mignon interchangeably. Actually, the filet is a particular cut of beef that comes from the larger tenderloin—a long, narrow muscle that runs along a cow’s back. Tenderloin is sometimes sold whole, but it’s usually divided up into smaller steaks like <i>tournedos</i> or the classic <i>filet mignon</i>. The filet mignon comes from the very front part of the tenderloin, the short loin. It’s often richly marbled with fat, making it both tender and delicious. Because the tenderloin (and thus, the filet mignon) isn’t from a hard-working muscle, it may have less beefy flavor than other cuts like the ribeye. To make up for this, many recipes for filet mignon call for adding a tasty fat like bacon or, in this case, a rich herb butter.</p> </section> <section> <header>Why Do They Call It Filet Mignon?</header> <p><i>Filet mignon</i> is French for “delicate filet,” referring to how tender this cut of meat is! When cooked correctly, you don’t even need a knife to cut it. Filet mignon is so tender because the muscle it comes from, the tenderloin primal, doesn’t do much work. Rather than being used for walking, this muscle simply supports the cow’s spine. Although the whole tenderloin is quite large, it’s divided into several smaller cuts for sale. In fact, there are only two small “true” filets on any cow—there’s barely more than a pound of filet mignon per steer. That’s why it’s such an expensive, prized cut! These single-serving portions, usually about two inches thick, are delicious, tender cuts perfect for a special dinner.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-15 divider-thick mx-auto"> <section class="recipe"> <header itemprop="name">Filet Mignon with Herb Butter</header> <div class="prep"> <span> <meta itemprop="prepTime" content="PT15M">Prep Time: 5 minutes</span> <span> <meta itemprop="cookTime" content="PT35M">Cooking Time: 10 minutes</span> <span> <meta itemprop="recipeYield">Serves: 4</span> </div> <div class="sub-head">Ingredients:</div> <ul class="ingredients no-bullet"> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">2 tablespoons salted grass-fed butter, softened and divided</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac12; tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped fine</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac12; tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped fine</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">1 teaspoon fresh parsley, chopped fine</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">1 clove garlic, minced</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">4 (8-ounce) filet mignons</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac12; teaspoon sea salt</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac12; teaspoon cracked black pepper</li> </ul> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium"> <div class="sub-head">Instructions:</div> <ol itemprop="recipeInstructions"> <p style="margin-left: -20px;"><i>Prepare the Herb Butter:</i></p> <li>In a small bowl, use a fork to mash together 1 tablespoon of softened butter with rosemary, thyme, parsley, and garlic. Alternatively, you can pulse together in a miniature food processor.</li> <li>Form into a log on a small piece of parchment or waxed paper and roll up like a hard candy, twisting the ends tightly to secure. </li> <li>Refrigerate until ready to use on the steaks, at least 15 minutes.</li> <p style="margin-left: -20px;"><i>Prepare the Steaks:</i></p> <li>Preheat the oven to 400&deg;F. Make sure the steaks are at room temperature.</li> <li>Trim any connective tissue from the filets mignons. Sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper on both sides.</li> <li>Heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat until extremely hot. Melt the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter in the skillet. </li> <li>Quickly add the steaks to the skillet. If it seems like they’re crowding together in the pan, sear in batches, adding more butter each time.</li> <li>Sear the filets for 2 minutes on each side or until a brown crust develops and releases easily from the pan. Do not move the steaks other than to flip them.</li> <li>Using a thick potholder, transfer the skillet with the steaks to the preheated oven. Roast until you reach your desired doneness and internal temperature: about 5 minutes (125&deg;F) for rare, 6 minutes (130&deg;F) for medium-rare, 7 minutes (140&deg;F) for medium, or 8 minutes (155&deg;F) for medium well. </li> <li>Remove the filets from the oven and transfer to a plate to rest for 5 minutes. Note: The internal temperature will continue to climb and finish cooking the steaks as they rest.</li> <li>Remove the herb butter from the fridge and cut into 4 slices. </li> <li>Top each steak with a slice of herb butter and serve.</li> </ol> </section> </article>
Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 1


Calories

211


Amount Per Serving

Total Fat

11.6 g

Sodium

327 mg

Carbohydrate

0.9 g

Sugar

0 g

Dietary Fiber

0.4 g

Protein

24.6 g


Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Serving Size 1


Calories

211


Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Amount Per Serving

Total Fat

11.6 g

Sodium

327 mg

Carbohydrate

0.9 g

Sugar

0 g

Dietary Fiber

0.4 g

Protein

24.6 g

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