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Can The Brain Use Ketones For Fuel?

Published December 03, 2018 (Revised: November 05, 2019) Read Time: 8 minutes
Ben Kissam

Written By: Ben Kissam, BS

Ben has a B.S. in Movement and Sports Science and over 7 years Certified Personal Training Experience.

ketosis-and-brain-function
<script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context":"http://schema.org", "@type":"BlogPosting", "author": { "@type": "Person", "name": "Ben Kissam, BS" }, "publisher": { "@type": "Organization", "name": "Warrior Made", "logo": { "@type": "ImageObject", "url": "https://www.warriormade.com", "image": "https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/media/public/2019/11/can-the-brain-use-ketones-thumbnail-0026.jpg" } }, "headline":"Can The Brain Use Ketones For Fuel?", "datePublished":"2018-12-03", "dateModified": "2019-11-05", "description":"Your brain needs a lot of energy to function properly. If you're on a ketogenic diet, here's how your brain uses ketones for fuel.", "image": "https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/media/public/2019/11/can-the-brain-use-ketones-thumbnail-0026.jpg" } </script> <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "Can the brain function on ketones?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The short answer: Yes, it can. In fact, the brain can perform quite well running on ketones.<br>When the body is in a state of glucose depletion (during periods of fasting, during intense exercise, or when following a ketogenic diet), it can run on ketones.<br>More specifically, about 70 percent of your brain can be fueled by ketones, or energy-providing chemicals made from fat. The rest of your brain needs glucose." } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "What are ketones?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The short answer: Ketones are chemicals from fat that are produced by your liver. These chemicals are what help you get into a state called 'ketosis'. In this state, you burn stored fat—not sugar—as your primary fuel source.<br>As we said, when you're depleted of glucose, your body produces ketones for your brain and body. They are considered a 'vital' alternative fuel source.<br>Note: We're talking about ketones produced by the body, not exogenous ketones. Those are supplements you can take, typically sold as a mixable powder. But the same idea applies. Because your brain and body can use them for energy, exogenous ketones are known to boost workout performance." } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "Does the brain need glucose?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The short answer: Some parts do. But most of your brain can run off ketones.<br>Your brain requires more energy than any other organ in your body. Neurons, or brain cells, burn up a lot of glucose. Not only that, but your brain very strictly regulates the type of fuel it will take in.<br>70 percent of your brain can run on ketones, but the rest needs to run on glucose, which is why eating a small amount of carbs on a ketogenic diet is helpful. Small amounts of carbs might seem inconsequential, but they're not because they fuel your brain.<br>In the event that your body doesn't have access to carbs, though, it can create its own glucose through a process called gluconeogenesis*. Your liver actually converts the amino acids in protein to glucose for your brain." } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "Is it okay for your brain to run on ketones?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "It is okay for your brain to run on ketones, though at first it might feel strange. <br>In fact, ketones fuel the brain more efficiently than glucose. Mitochondria* in cells function better, and your body as a whole is less dependent on glucose intake for energy.<br>*Mitochondria are the "powerhouse" of the cell, responsible for providing energy.<br>After all, you're used to running on glucose. The two mechanisms (glucose metabolism versus ketone metabolism) work very differently, so it may take some time for you to adjust.<br>There's a well-known "transition" period for keto dieters where they feel sluggish, have headaches, muscle cramps, and even stomach issues. It's called the "keto flu". If you notice brain fog in the early stages, that's completely normal too. <br>Once your body becomes more fat-adapted—or used to running on fat, not sugar— ketone levels in the blood will normalize and any adverse symptoms should go away." } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "How do you increase ketones in the brain? (4 ways)", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "1. Reduce the number of carbs you eat. <br>2. Exercise more <br>3. Eat more healthy fat <br>4. Try intermittent fasting" } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "Can the brain use ketones? Wrapping up", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "To sum it all up: Yes, your brain can run on ketones. Or, at least most of it can. 70 percent of your brain can function just fine without glucose, and your body's smart enough to create its own glucose even if you aren't eating any carbs (but you should be eating some if you're following a ketogenic diet).<br>And your brain actually benefits from running on ketones. They're more efficient than glucose for fueling that giant, energy-demanding organ between your ears. It can take a bit to adjust, but exercising, eating more fat and less carbs, and intermittent fasting can help you ramp up ketone production.<br>Tack on other benefits, like the potential to lose weight or ward off inflammation, and you can see how ketones can do your body—and brain—a whole lot of good." } }] } </script> <article> <div> <ul> <li><a href="#section1">Can the Brain Function on Ketones?</a></li> <li><a href="#section2">What are Ketones?</a></li> <li><a href="#section3">4 Benefits of Ketosis for the Brain and Body</a></li> <li><a href="#section4">Does the Brain Need Glucose?</a></li> <li><a href="#section5">Is it Okay for Your Brain to Run on Ketones?</a></li> <li><a href="#section6">How Do You Increase Ketones in the Brain? (4 ways)</a></li> <li><a href="#section7">Can the Brain Use Ketones? Wrapping Up</a></li> </ul> </div> <section> <p>Your brain requires a lot of energy—more than any other organ<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3390818/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">1</a></sup>. And usually, that energy comes in the form of glucose, or carbs.</p> <p>Hearing that, it might be confusing to hear that one of the benefits of a low-carb diet is increased brain function.</p> <p><i>If you're not eating carbs, where does your brain get energy from?</i></p> <p>The answer: <i>ketones</i>. When your body runs out of glucose, it turns to ketones for energy. And it might surprise you to learn how your brain responds.</p> <p>In this article we'll explain what ketones are, everything you need to know about the brain and ketones, and answer the question, <i>"Can the brain use ketones for energy?"</i></p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section1"> <h2>Can the brain function on ketones?</h2> <p><i>The short answer</i>: Yes, it can. In fact, the brain can perform quite well running on ketones.</p> <p>When the body is in a state of glucose depletion (during periods of fasting, during intense exercise, or when following a ketogenic diet), it can run on ketones<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2874681/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">2</a></sup>.</p> <p>More specifically, about <i>70 percent</i> of your brain can be fueled by ketones, or energy-providing chemicals made from fat <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21489321" rel="nofollow noreferrer">3</a></sup>. The rest of your brain needs glucose**.</p> <p><i>*See section:</i> "What are ketones?" <i>below for more.</i></p> <p><i>** See section:</i> "Does the brain need glucose?" <i>later in the article for more.</i></p> <p>Basically, when your body gets low on glucose, blood ketone levels elevate to supplement your brain's massive energy requirements<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3900881/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">4</a></sup>. In the prolonged absence of carbohydrates, your body eventually adapts to using ketones for fuel (well, 70 percent)<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2129159/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">5</a></sup>.</p> <p>Your brain is probably <i>used</i> to running on glucose, but that doesn't mean it can't function well using ketones.</p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/brain-on-ketones-science-0026.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/brain-on-ketones-science-0026.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/brain-on-ketones-science-0026.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/brain-on-ketones-science-LR-0026.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="brain-on-ketones-science"> </picture> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section2"> <h2>What are ketones?</h2> <p><i>The short answer</i>: Ketones are chemicals from fat that are produced by your liver. These chemicals are what help you get into a state called 'ketosis'. In this state, you burn stored fat—not sugar—as your primary fuel source<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28599043" rel="nofollow noreferrer">6</a></sup>. </p> <p>As we said, when you're depleted of glucose, your body produces ketones for your brain and body. They are considered a 'vital' alternative fuel source<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5313038/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">7</a></sup>. </p> <p><i>Note</i>: We're talking about ketones produced by the body, not <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/the-truth-about-exogenous-ketones-an-inside-look" rel="noreferrer">exogenous ketones</a>. Those are supplements you can take, typically sold as a mixable powder. But the same idea applies. Because your brain and body can use them for energy, exogenous ketones are known to boost workout performance<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30531462" rel="nofollow noreferrer">8</a></sup>.</p> <p>When your body is primarily running on ketones, this is known as ketosis<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6251269/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">9</a></sup>. We'll discuss this in the next section.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section3"> <h2>4 benefits of ketosis for the brain and body</h2> <p>Nutritional ketosis is the metabolic state when you're body is using ketones for energy<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK499830/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">10</a></sup>. Low-carb diets that promote ketosis (like the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/keto-101-a-beginners-guide-to-keto" rel="noreferrer">ketogenic diet</a>) have exploded in popularity in recent years.</p> <p>Here are 4 reasons why: </p> <ol> <li><strong>Ketosis is a proven way to manage and lose weight</strong>: When it comes to weight loss, low-carb diets work more effectively than low-fat diets<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16476868" rel="nofollow noreferrer">11</a></sup> <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23651522" rel="nofollow noreferrer">12</a></sup>. This is because your body burns more calories when it's low on glucose<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6233655/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">13</a></sup>. And plus, once you enter ketosis, you start using fat reserves for energy. </li> <li><strong>Ketosis reduces inflammation</strong>: Being in ketosis <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/can-ketosis-reduce-inflammation" rel="noreferrer">reduces inflammation</a> and even boosts your metabolism<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30128963" rel="nofollow noreferrer">14</a></sup>. The former is a big deal, considering chronic (long-lasting) inflammation increases your risk of cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and certain cancers<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5805548/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">15</a></sup>.</li> <li><strong>Ketosis improves blood markers like cholesterol</strong>: A 2018 study in <a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29910305" rel="nofollow noreferrer"><i>Sports Basel</i></a> found a ketogenic diet not only improved cholesterol, but other blood markers like triglycerides and fasting glucose.</li> <li><strong>Ketosis improves cognition and mental functioning</strong>: Even though the brain is used to running off glucose (see the next section for more), a 2018 study in <a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6286979/" rel="nofollow noreferrer"><i>Frontiers of Aging Neuroscience</i></a> found that ketosis may increase cognition and brain function. This connects to other studies that suggest a ketogenic diet might help treat certain neurological disorders<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4112040/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">16</a></sup>.</li> </ol> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/ketones-to-fuel-brain-0026.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/ketones-to-fuel-brain-0026.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/ketones-to-fuel-brain-0026.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/ketones-to-fuel-brain-LR-0026.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="ketones-to-fuel-brain"> </picture> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section4"> <h2>Does the brain need glucose?</h2> <p><i>The short answer</i>: Some parts do. But most of your brain can run off ketones.</p> <p>Your brain requires more energy than any other organ in your body. Neurons, or brain cells, burn up a lot of glucose. Not only that, but your brain very strictly regulates the type of fuel it will take in<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3900881/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">17</a></sup>.</p> <p>70 percent of your brain can run on ketones, but the rest needs to run on glucose, which is why eating a small amount of carbs on a ketogenic diet is helpful. Small amounts of carbs might seem inconsequential, but they're not because they fuel your brain.</p> <p>In the event that your body doesn't have access to carbs, though, it can create its own glucose through a process called <i>gluconeogenesis</i>*. Your liver actually converts the amino acids in protein to glucose for your brain<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK541119/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">18</a></sup>.</p> <p><i>*Here's an easy way to remember the word:</i></p> <ul> <li>Gluco = glucose, or sugar</li> <li>Neo = new</li> <li>Genesis = creation of</li> </ul> <p><i>Therefore, 'gluconeogenesis' means the creation of new glucose to be used as energy in your body.</i></p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section5"> <h2>Is it okay for your brain to run on ketones?</h2> <p>It <i>is</i> okay for your brain to run on ketones, though at first it might feel strange. </p> <p>In fact, ketones fuel the brain more efficiently than glucose. Mitochondria* in cells function better, and your body as a whole is less dependent on glucose intake for energy <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3219306/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">19</a></sup> <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2367001/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">20</a></sup> <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6356942/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">21</a></sup>.</p> <p><i>*Mitochondria are the "powerhouse" of the cell, responsible for providing energy.</i></p> <p>After all, you're used to running on glucose. The two mechanisms (glucose metabolism versus ketone metabolism) work very differently, so it may take some time for you to adjust.</p> <p>There's a well-known "transition" period for keto dieters where they feel sluggish, have headaches, muscle cramps, and even stomach issues<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5858534/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">22</a></sup>. It's called the "keto flu". If you notice brain fog in the early stages, that's completely normal too.</p> <p>Once your body becomes more <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/what-does-it-mean-to-be-fat-adapted" rel="noreferrer">fat-adapted</a>—or used to running on fat, not sugar— ketone levels in the blood will normalize and any adverse symptoms should go away.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section6"> <h2>How do you increase ketones in the brain? (4 ways)</h2> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/brain-on-glucose-0026.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/brain-on-glucose-0026.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/brain-on-glucose-0026.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/brain-on-glucose-LR-0026.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="brain-on-glucose"> </picture> <h3>1. Reduce the number of carbs you eat</h3> <p>When you eat carbs, your body stores glucose in your liver and muscles<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK21190/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">23</a></sup>. This is why you hear runners sometimes say they "carb load" before a race; that way, their muscles are full of sugar for competition.</p> <p>If you want to increase your blood ketone levels—which increases ketones in the brain—<a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/how-many-carbs-a-day-should-you-eat-to-lose-weight/" rel="noreferrer">restrict carbs</a> to between 20 and 50 grams per day<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK499830/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">24</a></sup>. Doing so will force your body to use up its stored glucose and eventually start producing ketones.</p> <p>Things like <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/when-is-the-best-time-to-eat-carbs-on-keto" rel="noreferrer">carb timing</a> and the types of carbs you eat can also be a factor. Stick to <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/keto-fiber-foods-5-fiber-rich-foods-to-add" rel="noreferrer">high-fiber, lower carb fruits</a>, green vegetables, and nuts, and eat your carbs around the time you workout (so you burn them off right after). </p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/exercise-for-ketosis-0026.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/exercise-for-ketosis-0026.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/exercise-for-ketosis-0026.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/exercise-for-ketosis-LR-0026.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="exercise-for-ketosis"> </picture> <h3>2. Exercise more</h3> <p>If you want to ramp up ketone production, go get a workout in. Not only are ketones used as a fuel source during workouts, but there's a noticeable uptake in your levels <i>after</i> you exercise<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5407977/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">25</a></sup>.</p> <p>An intense workout can also help burn up any stored glucose, which can help you <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/87-things-to-avoid-on-the-keto-diet" rel="noreferrer">get into ketosis faster</a>.</p> <p>Any form of exercise is good. If you really want to burn off a bunch of glucose, try a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/the-best-full-body-workout-for-weight-loss/" rel="noreferrer">full-body</a> high-intensity interval (HIIT) workout. HIIT workouts elevate your heart rate and use multiple muscle groups, which'll burn a ton of calories.</p> <p>Or, just go for a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/10-reasons-why-walking-is-the-best-exercise" rel="noreferrer">walk</a>. Walking is less intense, but works just the same. It will help burn off sugar stored in your muscles and liver.</p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/mcts-for-ketones-0026.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/mcts-for-ketones-0026.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/mcts-for-ketones-0026.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/mcts-for-ketones-LR-0026.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="mcts-for-ketones"> </picture> <h3>3. Eat more healthy fat</h3> <p>Fat forms the basis of the keto diet. Approximately 70 percent of your daily calories come from fat—about 155 grams<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6251269/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">26</a></sup>.</p> <p>Healthy fats like nuts, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/healthier-substitutes-for-vegetable-oil" rel="noreferrer">healthy oils</a>, and coconut are all staples of keto. MCT oil in coconut is especially beneficial, because the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/mct-oil/" rel="noreferrer">MCTs</a>, or medium chain triglycerides in coconut, can increase ketone production within an hour of consumption<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1245892" rel="nofollow noreferrer">27</a></sup>.</p> <p>Fat also provides a ton of energy. One gram of protein or carbs has only 4 calories; one gram of fat has 9 calories<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK218769/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">28</a></sup>. Therefore, consuming lots of healthy fats keep you full and helps you avoid eating too many carbs, which might knock you out of ketosis.</p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/fasting-for-ketones-0026.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/fasting-for-ketones-0026.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/fasting-for-ketones-0026.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/fasting-for-ketones-LR-0026.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="fasting-for-ketones"> </picture> <h3>4. Try intermittent fasting</h3> <p>Intermittent fasting, or timing your meals into a window of about 8 hours each day, is another good method for increasing ketone production for your brain*<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5913738/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">29</a></sup>. After all, the job of ketones is to provide an alternative fuel source for your brain during periods of starvation.</p> <p><i>*There are different types of fasting, though the 16 hour-per-day fast is probably the most popular (with an 8 hour eating window). Another example is a 24 hour fast once or twice a week. While longer fasts may not be a good option for everyone, they have been shown to increase ketone production even more<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5959807/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">30</a></sup>.</i></p> <p>Fasting is also good for:</p> <ul> <li><a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/how-to-use-intermittent-fasting-to-accelerate-your/" rel="noreferrer">Weight loss</a>.</li> <li>Giving your body a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/fasting-and-autophagy-understanding-your-body" rel="noreferrer">natural reset</a>.</li> <li>Reducing inflammation<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(19)30850-5" rel="nofollow noreferrer">32</a></sup>.</li> </ul> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section7"> <h2>Can the brain use ketones? Wrapping up</h2> <p><i>To sum it all up</i>: Yes, your brain can run on ketones. Or, at least most of it can. 70 percent of your brain can function just fine without glucose, and your body's smart enough to create its own glucose even if you aren't eating any carbs (but you should be eating <i>some</i> if you're following a ketogenic diet).</p> <p>And your brain actually benefits from running on ketones. They're more efficient than glucose for fueling that giant, energy-demanding organ between your ears. It can take a bit to adjust, but exercising, eating more fat and less carbs, and intermittent fasting can help you ramp up ketone production.</p> <p>Tack on other benefits, like the potential to lose weight or ward off inflammation, and you can see how ketones can do your body—and brain—a whole lot of good.</p> </section> </article>

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