Contact Us

6 Exercises To Help Align Your Spine

Published September 10, 2018
Ben Kissam

Written By: Ben Kissam, BS

Ben has a B.S. in Movement and Sports Science and over 7 years Certified Personal Training Experience.

spine-alignment-exercises
<script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context":"http://schema.org", "@type":"BlogPosting", "author": { "@type": "Person", "name": "Ben Kissam, BS" }, "publisher": { "@type": "Organization", "name": "Warrior Made", "logo": { "@type": "ImageObject", "url": "https://www.warriormade.com", "image": "https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/media/public/2019/09/spine-alignment-exercises-thumbnail-0003.jpg" } }, "headline":"6 Exercises To Help Align Your Spine", "datePublished":"2018-09-10", "dateModified": "2019-10-2", "description":"Does your spine feel out of alignment? Add these 6 bodyweight spine alignment exercises to your workouts.", "image": "https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/media/public/2019/09/spine-alignment-exercises-thumbnail-0003.jpg" } </script> <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How do you know if your spine is misaligned?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Spinal misalignment may be the result of injuries from exercise or sports, poor posture, or even psychological distress. If your spine is out of position, you might experience symptoms like back pain, headaches, and discomfort when exercising, sitting, or even sleeping." } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "How can I straighten my spine naturally?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "1. Do a posture check\n\n2. Stretch tight muscles\n\n3. Strengthen muscles that support good posture" } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "How do you keep your spine aligned?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "By practicing healthy habits and making improvements over time.\n\nProper posture, regular exercise, and limiting stress will all help keep your spine aligned. Additionally, there are a handful of ways you can practice daily posture improvements while going about your schedule." } }] } </script> <article> <div> <ul> <li><a href="#section1">How Do You Know if Your Spine is Misaligned?</a></li> <li><a href="#section2">How Can You Straighten Your Spine Naturally?</a></li> <li><a href="#section3">How Do I Keep My Spine Aligned?</a></li> <li><a href="#section4">6 Exercises to Help Align Your Spine</a></li> <li><a href="#section5">Spine Alignment Exercises—Wrap-Up</a></li> </ul> </div> <section> <p>It’s not hard to tell when your spine is out of alignment. Chances are you’re experiencing discomfort or noticing something feels “off” when you sit or exercise.</p> <p>And if you are, it’s probably not something dramatically wrong with your spine that you need to be worried about. The <a target="_blank" href="https://www.acatoday.org/Patients/Health-Wellness-Information/Back-Pain-Facts-and-statistics" rel="nofollow noreferrer"><i>American Chiropractic Association</i></a> estimates 80 percent of people experience back pain in their life, including spinal issues <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.acatoday.org/Patients/Health-Wellness-Information/Back-Pain-Facts-and-statistics" rel="nofollow noreferrer">1</a></sup>. <i>However</i>, leaving a spinal issue unaddressed could lead to bigger issues later on.</p> <p>Fortunately though, simple habits such as posture checks, stretching, and adding spine-strengthening exercises to your workouts can do wonders for improving your back <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3806175/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">2</a></sup> <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3990364/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">3</a></sup> <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.spine-health.com/wellness/ergonomics/posture-straighten-your-back" rel="nofollow noreferrer">4</a></sup>.</p> <p>Here’s more on how the spine gets out of alignment, how to straighten it naturally, and 6 bodyweight exercises that will help get you back to normal.</p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/paper-documents-drawing-illustration-spine-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/paper-documents-drawing-illustration-spine-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/paper-documents-drawing-illustration-spine-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/paper-documents-drawing-illustration-spine-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="paper-documents-drawing-illustration"> </picture> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section1"> <h2>How do you know if your spine is misaligned?</h2> <p>Spinal misalignment may be the result of injuries from exercise or sports, poor posture, or even psychological distress<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30817729" rel="nofollow noreferrer">5</a></sup>. If your spine is out of position, you might experience symptoms like back pain, headaches, and discomfort when exercising, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/5-simple-chair-exercises-for-everyday-fitness/" rel="noreferrer">sitting</a>, or even sleeping<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4934575/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">6</a></sup>.</p> <p>If you think your spine is misaligned, you can check yourself or have someone help you. Here’s 2 ways to check right at home:</p> <ul> <li><b>Lying down</b>, check to see if your hips are lying evenly. Is one leg shorter than the other? Are you uncomfortable lying on your back?</li> <li><b>Standing up</b>, check to see if your head is tilted to one side. Is one shoulder higher than the other? Is one hip higher than the other? A mirror is helpful here. </li> </ul> <p>If you answered yes, your spine may be out of alignment. </p> <p>Keep in mind, there are different kinds of spinal misalignments. For example, there’s rounding in the upper back (kyphosis) and excessive arching of the lower back (lordosis)<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.webmd.com/back-pain/guide/types-of-spine-curvature-disorders" rel="nofollow noreferrer">7</a></sup>.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section2"> <h2>How can I straighten my spine naturally?</h2> <h3>1. Do a posture check</h3> <p>Here’s another test you can try. Stand tall with your back against the wall. Then, bring your chin back (think about intentionally making a double chin).</p> <p>In this position, can you touch your head, shoulders, hips, and heels to the wall at the same time? And if you can, do you have to strain to hold it there?</p> <p>If this position is challenging (or unattainable), those are signs your spine is out of alignment. </p> <p>(We discuss tips for fixing this later on.)</p> <h3>2. Stretch tight muscles</h3> <p>Stretching increases the range of motion and flexibility of your spine<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3575421" rel="nofollow noreferrer">8</a></sup>. Several studies have found that stretching and <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/pilates-vs-yoga" rel="noreferrer">yoga</a> improve spinal mobility, especially if you’re older<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3990364/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">9</a></sup> <sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4339138/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">10</a></sup>.</p> <p>It makes sense that you might experience back pain if the muscles supporting or working with the spine are tight.</p> <p>These muscles include:</p> <ul> <li><b><a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/the-best-erector-spinae-exercises" rel="noreferrer">Erector spinae</a></b>- Provide support on either side of the spine. Help straighten the back.</li> <li><b><a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/best-oblique-exercises-for-core-strength" rel="noreferrer">Obliques</a></b>- Supports the torso, connects the abdominals to the lower back muscles and aids in rotation.</li> <li><b><a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/glutes-101-best-exercises-for-your-gluteus-maximus/" rel="noreferrer">Glutes</a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/5-exercises-for-hip-pain" rel="noreferrer">hips</a></b>- Since the base of your spine goes into your pelvis, these muscles help distribute force from the lower to upper body and take pressure off the spine.</li> <li><b><a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/best-bodyweight-chest-workout" rel="noreferrer">Pecs</a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/at-home-exercises-to-strengthen-your-shoulders/" rel="noreferrer">shoulders</a></b>- Rounding your back or slouching when you sit puts stress on the cervical (upper) and thoracic (middle) spine.</li> </ul> <p>(See “<a href="#section4">6 exercises to help align your spin</a>” below for specific exercises.)</p> <h3>3. Strengthen muscles that support good posture</h3> <p>The spine is our body’s central support structure<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279468/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">11</sup></a>. Your spine is responsible for carrying the weight of your head, supporting the torso and arms, and allowing your body to move in every direction<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279468/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">12</sup></a>. </p> <p>Keeping the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/posture-exercises" rel="noreferrer">postural muscles</a> (like the ones discussed in the section above) strong helps protect your spine and prevent injuries<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3806175/" rel="nofollow noreferrer">13</sup></a>.</p> <p>In fact, a 2016 study from the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5091063/#" rel="nofollow noreferrer"><i>Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation</i></a> found strength training and <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/10-reasons-why-walking-is-the-best-exercise" rel="noreferrer">walking</a> reduced pain and restored lumbar (lower back) function in patients with chronic back pain<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5091063/#" rel="nofollow noreferrer">14</sup></a>.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section3"> <h2>How do you keep your spine aligned?</h2> <p>By practicing healthy habits and making improvements over time. </p> <p>Proper posture, regular exercise, and limiting stress will all help keep your spine aligned. Additionally, there are a handful of ways you can practice daily posture improvements while going about your schedule.</p> <p>Here are some keys for good posture:</p> <ul> <li>When <strong>standing</strong>, pull your shoulders back and engage your core.</li> <li>When <strong>sitting</strong> at a desk, elevate the computer screen so you aren’t looking down. Take regular movement and stretch breaks<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.spine-health.com/wellness/ergonomics/posture-straighten-your-back" rel="nofollow noreferrer">15</a></sup>.</li> <li>When <strong>sleeping</strong>, place a small pillow under the back of your knees if you sleep on your back. If you sleep on your side, put a firm pillow between your knees. This reduces stress on your spine<sup><a target="_blank" href="https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=1&ContentID=4460" rel="nofollow noreferrer">16</a></sup>.</li> </ul> <p>Once you find the right postures, make a conscious effort to notice them. Also practice self-checks throughout the day. With practice, these positions become more natural.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section4"> <h2>6 exercises to help align your spine</h2> <h3>1. Prone scorpion stretch</h3> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-prone-scorpion-stretch-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-prone-scorpion-stretch-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-prone-scorpion-stretch-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-prone-scorpion-stretch-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="prone-scorpion-stretch"> </picture> <p><strong>Good for</strong>: tight pecs and shoulders, core stability.</p> <p>Here’s what to do:</p> <ul> <li>Lie on your stomach with your left cheek on the floor (look to the right)..</li> <li>Place your arms out to the side like a ‘T’—arms level with the shoulders, thumbs pointing up to the ceiling.</li> <li>Bend your right knee to lift the lower part of your leg off the ground. The right toes should be pointing to the ceiling.</li> <li>Lift the knee up off the floor. Let your right hip open as you push your right hand in the floor.</li> <li>Go until you feel a stretch in your pec and shoulder. Hold for a few seconds, then return your knee to the ground.</li> <li>Repeat on the other side.</li> </ul> <h3>2. Wall angels</h3> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-wall-angels-1-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-wall-angels-1-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-wall-angels-1-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-wall-angels-1-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-wall-angels"> </picture> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-wall-angels-2-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-wall-angels-2-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-wall-angels-2-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-wall-angels-2-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-wall-angels"> </picture> <p><strong>Good for</strong>: shoulder mobility, core stabilization</p> <ul> <li>Stand with your feet 12 inches from the wall. Carefully lean back to get into position. Touch your glutes, shoulders, and head to the wall. </li> <li>Place your arms on the wall, pointing out, in line with your shoulders. (Your fingers and elbows should always stay touching the wall.)</li> <li>Push your arms directly up in a vertical motion until they’re fully extended, or as high as you can go comfortably (as if you were making a snow angel with your upper body, on the wall).</li> <li>Do 8 to 10 reps, slow and controlled. Breathe in before you start each new rep, and exhale as you move vertically up the wall.</li> </ul> <h3>3. Child’s pose to moose antler</h3> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-clids-pose-moose-antler-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-clids-pose-moose-antler-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-clids-pose-moose-antler-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-clids-pose-moose-antler-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="childs-pose-moose-antler"> </picture> <p><strong>Good for</strong>: thoracic (middle) spine mobility, shoulder mobility, rotational strength</p> <ul> <li>Start in child’s pose: Resting on your shins, bend your torso downward and forward, placing your hands on the ground in front of you.</li> <li>Bring one hand off the ground and to your ear. With your thumb touching your head and your elbow pointing out, rotate your spine, opening up the rib cage towards the wall. </li> <li>Do slow and controlled reps—5 to 10 seconds each. Alternate sides and do 3 to 5 on each.</li> </ul> <h3>4. YTW’s</h3> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-1-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-1-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-1-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-1-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-ytw"> </picture> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-2-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-2-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-2-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-2-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-ytw"> </picture> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-3-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-3-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-3-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-ytw-3-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-ytw"> </picture> <p><strong>Good for</strong>: shoulder mobility, lower back stability</p> <ul> <li>Start with your feet shoulder width apart. Bend your knees and kick your butt back, keeping a straight back. </li> <li>Start with your hands by your side.</li> <li>Make each “letter” pose with your arms from this position. Do these slow and controlled. <ul> <li>‘Y’- With your hands by your side, raise them straight until they’re overhead. Return hands to your sides. Do 10 to 12 reps.</li> <li>‘T’- With your thumbs forward, raise your hands out to the sides, like a T. Keep your arms straight. Do 10 to 12 reps.</li> <li>‘W’- With your hands by your side, pull your elbows back so your arms are at a 90-degree angle (like a bent row). Now, rotate up. Your palms will be facing the wall in front of you when standing again.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> <h3>5. Infinity hovers</h3> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-infinity-hovers-1-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-infinity-hovers-1-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-infinity-hovers-1-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-infinity-hovers-1-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-infinity-hovers"> </picture> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-infinity-hovers-2-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-infinity-hovers-2-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-infinity-hovers-2-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-infinity-hovers-2-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-infinity-hovers"> </picture> <p><strong>Good for</strong>: upper back mobility, shoulder mobility</p> <ul> <li>Sit in a tall kneeling position. Before starting, squeeze your glutes and tuck your ribs to maintain neutral spine.</li> <li>With your arms out to the side, bend the elbows so one hand goes behind your head and down your upper back, and the other goes behind your lower back to reach up. Bring them as close together as possible.</li> <li>Switch sides. Do these slow and controlled, on at least a 5 second count. Aim to get your hands closer together as you go. Do 2 sets of 10 to 12.</li> </ul> <h3>6. Bird dogs, dead bugs</h3> <p><strong>Good for</strong>: core strength, spine stability</p> <p>Both of these core exercises force you stabilize while your extremities (arms and legs) move.</p> <p><strong>Bird dogs:</strong></p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-bird-dog-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-bird-dog-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-bird-dog-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-bird-dog-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-bird-dog"> </picture> <ul> <li>Start on all fours, with your hands under your shoulders and knees under the hips.</li> <li>Raise your right arm and reach it forward.</li> <li>As you bring this arm forward, kick the left leg back behind you.</li> <li>Straighten both the arm and leg, and hold for one second.</li> <li>Slowly (on a 3-count) bring the arm and leg back. Repeat on the other side.</li> <li>Do 6-8 on each side.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Dead bugs:</strong></p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-dead-bug-1-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-dead-bug-1-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-dead-bug-1-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-dead-bug-1-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-dead-bug"> </picture> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-dead-bug-2-0003.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-dead-bug-2-0003.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-dead-bug-2-0003.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/jenny-spine-alignment-dead-bug-2-LR-0003.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="spine-alignment-dead-bug"> </picture> <ul> <li>Lying on your back, bend your knees so your heels touch the floor</li> <li>Squeeze your abs and tighten your glutes.</li> <li>Raise your bent legs. Position them so your knees are over your hips. Then bring your arms up straight in front of you (you should look like a dead bug on its back).</li> <li>Move the left arm behind your head straight. Bring the right leg (opposite) out straight, but don’t touch the floor.</li> <li>Like a bird dog, slowly return to the position then repeat on the other side.</li> </ul> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section5"> <h2>Spine alignment exercises—wrap-up</h2> <p>In terms of movement and posture, nothing takes more responsibility in our body than the spine. Keeping it healthy is important, and one way to do that is by making sure it’s in its natural alignment.</p> <p>Even though the causes of spine misalignment vary (injury, stress, poor posture), improvements can be made by adding posture checks and the 6 exercises discussed into your routine. </p> <p>Start slow, focus on good form, and don’t forget to notice when things feel “right” again. The mind-body connection is important. Over time, alignment will improve. And as a result, you’ll reap the benefits of a healthy, mobile spine.</p> </section> </article>

Previous Post

Back to Exercise

Next Post