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Stress and Your Health

Published September 11, 2018
Kate Sullivan

Written By: Kate Sullivan, MS

Kate holds a MS in Business Psychology and is currently a PHD researcher in Well-Being and Performance Psychology.

stress-and-health
<article> <div> <ul> <li><a href="#section1">Are There Different Types of Stress?</a></li> <li><a href="#section2">How Does Stress Affect Health?</a></li> <li><a href="#section3">How Can I Manage Stress?</a></li> <li><a href="#section4">Wrap Up</a></li> </ul> </div> <section> <p>Stress seems to be everywhere in our busy, modern lives.</p> <p>Although it’s not possible to avoid stress completely—and certain kinds of stress can even help you stay motivated—stress and health go hand-in-hand. How you manage the stress in your life can have a serious impact on your physical and mental health.</p> <p>In this article, we’ll dive into the different types of stress; how stress can affect your mind and body; and practical ways to cope with stress better every day.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section1"> <script type="application/ld+json">{"@context":"https://schema.org","@type":"FAQPage","mainEntity":[{"@type":"Question","name":"Are There Different Types of Stress?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"There are different kinds of stress that can affect your emotional and physical state in a variety of different ways.\n\nStress: By its most basic definition, stress is your body’s physical and mental response to a demanding situation 1. It can be good or bad, depending on the situation and your own personality, as well as your current circumstances\n\nDistress: This is the kind of negative pressure you probably think of immediately when someone says the word “stress.” Some examples of distress triggers can include family fights, layoffs, overwhelming work pressure, and more. Left unchecked, distress can lead to a range of physical and mental problems from weight gain to sleep issues to heart disease, autoimmune issues, depression, or anxiety.\n\nEustress: Stress can be beneficial, too. Eustress, which literally means “good stress,” pushes us to be our best selves, encouraging a growth mindset"}}]}</script> <h2>Are There Different Types of Stress?</h2> <p>There are different kinds of stress that can affect your emotional and physical state in a variety of different ways.</p> <ul> <li><b>Stress:</b> By its most basic definition, stress is your body’s physical and mental response to a demanding situation <sup><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J075v08n02_03" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">1</a></sup>. It can be good or bad, depending on the situation and your own personality, as well as your current circumstances.</li> <li><b>Distress:</b> This is the kind of negative pressure you probably think of immediately when someone says the word “stress.”</li> <p>Some examples of <i>distress</i> triggers can include family fights, layoffs, overwhelming work pressure, and more. Left unchecked, distress can lead to a range of physical and mental problems from weight gain to sleep issues to heart disease, autoimmune issues, depression, or anxiety <sup><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J075v08n02_03" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">1</a></sup>.</p> <li><b>Eustress:</b> Stress can be beneficial, too. <i>Eustress</i>, which literally means “good stress,” pushes us to be our best selves, encouraging a growth mindset <sup><a href="https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/02683940310502412/full/html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">2</a></sup>.</li> <p>It involves some of the same challenges as distress, but instead of making us anxious or scared, it drives us to perform better <sup><a href="https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1016/S1479-3555(03)03007-5/full/html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">3</a></sup>. For example, your last big work project, while difficult, might have been the exact push you needed to learn a new job skill.</p> <p>Stress also spans different time periods, regardless of what kind of stress you’re experiencing.</p> <li><b>Acute Stress:</b> Acute stress happens for a short period of time and then ends. It’s usually tied to a particular event or circumstance in your life, like a birth or death, a big move, a promotion, etc.</li> <li><b>Chronic Stress:</b> Chronic stress lasts for a long time and can seem like a permanent fixture in your life. An intense job with too many demands is one of the most common causes of chronic stress, although personal situations like a troubled relationship or an ongoing health issue can also cause chronic stress. </li> </ul> <p>No matter which type of stress you may be experiencing, stress and health are linked. A small amount of stress in the form of an exciting project at work or at home can challenge and engage you, boosting your motivation and well-being <sup><a href="https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/02683940310502412/full/html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">2</a></sup>. However, chronic stress can have long-lasting negative consequences for your health.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section2"> <script type="application/ld+json">{"@context":"https://schema.org","@type":"FAQPage","mainEntity":[{"@type":"Question","name":"How Does Stress Affect Health?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"Our bodies and minds are linked in complex ways that scientists are constantly working to understand. You’ve probably experienced this for yourself: Ever had a stomach ache when you were nervous about something? That’s the mind-body connection at work."}}]}</script> <h2>How Does Stress Affect Health?</h2> <p>Our bodies and minds are linked in complex ways that scientists are constantly working to understand <sup><a href="https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/imp/jcs/2001/00000008/F0020009/1227" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">4</a>, <a href="https://nyaspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2005.tb06153.x" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">5</a></sup>. You’ve probably experienced this for yourself: Ever had a stomach ache when you were nervous about something? That’s the mind-body connection at work.</p> <p>Thanks to this connection, stress affects your health in a range of ways, both mental and physical.</p> <h3>Physical Responses to Stress</h3> <p>Racing heart, tense muscles, involuntary twitches, headaches, stomach aches, cramps—all of these are symptoms of too much stress.</p> <p>Our bodies are designed to alert us to danger, respond quickly, and head to safety; that’s the <i>fight or flight response</i> <sup><a href="https://science.sciencemag.org/content/270/5236/644.abstract" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">6</a></sup>.</p> <p>But the helpful reaction that kept our ancestors out of the jaws of a saber-toothed tiger can backfire in our modern world where we are constantly “on”, whether at work or play. Phone notifications, worrisome news, and the continual noise of life keep us in a state of high alert.</p> <p>Consistent stress can result from all of the above. And this chronic stress causes several hormones to be released in your body, including adrenaline and cortisol.</p> <p>To help you escape danger, these compounds make you react faster by diverting resources from your digestive, immune, and reproductive systems to your circulatory and nervous systems <sup><a href="https://science.sciencemag.org/content/270/5236/644.abstract" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">6</a></sup>.</p> <p>Overload on stress and you also overload on cortisol and adrenaline, straining your heart and compromising many of your bodily systems. Your immune system can become suppressed, your digestion slows, your kidneys and liver may struggle to keep up, and you may find that you’re constantly tired but can’t sleep <sup><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0031938401004723" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">7</a>, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0306453014003473" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">8</a>, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/030698779190212H" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">9</a></sup>.</p> <p>Chronic stress can cause a range of physical problems, including:</p> <ul> <li>Weight gain or loss</li> <li>Hair loss</li> <li>Fatigue</li> <li>Headaches</li> <li>Ulcers <sup><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2013318/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">10</a></sup></li> <li>Diabetes</li> <li>Heart disease <sup><a href="https://heart.bmj.com/content/89/5/475" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">11</a></sup></li> <li>Cancer <sup><a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1981-21620-001" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">12</a></sup></li> </ul> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/massage-neck-back-woman-shoulders-0006.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/massage-neck-back-woman-shoulders-0006.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/massage-neck-back-woman-shoulders-0006.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/massage-neck-back-woman-shoulders-LR-0006.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="massage-neck-back-woman-shoulders"> </picture> <h4>Can Stress Cause Body Aches?</h4> <p>When you’re stressed, your entire body tenses up, ready to react to the perceived danger. This can cause a whole host of muscle aches and pains, whether the stress is chronic or acute.</p> <p>Stress can cause aches almost anywhere in the body, but many people find their stress manifests most as pain in their:</p> <ul> <li>Jaw</li> <li>Shoulders and neck</li> <li>Chest</li> <li><a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/two-exercises-to-fix-back-pain" rel="noreferrer">Back</a></li> </ul> <p>You may also experience headaches, typically starting at the temples or the back of the head <sup><a href="https://headachejournal.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1526-4610.1993.hed3306301.x" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">13</a></sup>. Some people also develop muscle spasms, often in the small of the back or near the eye <sup><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0304395985901083" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">14</a></sup>.</p> <p>People tend to tense in these areas because of that fight or flight reaction--if you try to run from danger, you might instinctively hunch your shoulders to make a smaller target. Meanwhile, your back and chest tense to support your upper body as you flee--all <i>flight</i> reactions. Your jaw tenses as a <i>fight</i> reaction--thinking you might need to snap at someone. </p> <p>As for those tension headaches and muscle spasms, they’re frequently related to your body’s attempts to divert resources to your senses, a response that can go awry if there’s no true external danger to respond to.</p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-young-stressed-study-student-0006.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-young-stressed-study-student-0006.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-young-stressed-study-student-0006.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-young-stressed-study-student-LR-0006.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="woman-young-stressed-study-student"> </picture> <h3>Emotional Responses to Stress</h3> <p>Stress and health are also linked to your personality, emotions, and ability to cope. Different people respond to stress in different ways—and you may not always respond to stress the same way in different circumstances <sup><a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.clinpsy.1.102803.144141" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">15</a></sup>. </p> <p>You might experience physical or mental symptoms at different times or as the result of different stressful circumstances.</p> <p>In the short term, stress can lead to feelings of anxiety, depression, lethargy, or detachment <sup><a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ashley_Shurick/publication/239888983_Responding_to_trauma_and_loss_An_emotion_regulation_perspective/links/00b7d5239dfdd317e3000000.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">16</a></sup>. </p> <p>Chronic stress has even more emotional consequences. Someone who’s under constant stress may find themselves withdrawing from daily life, giving up favorite activities, sleeping too much or not enough, or even developing clinical anxiety and depression <sup><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0191886900001136" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">17</a>, <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2F0022-3514.54.3.486" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">18</a></sup>. </p> <p>Chronic stress can even lead to developing addiction problems as a way to cope, from gambling addiction to alcoholism <sup><a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2003-09670-014" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">19</a></sup>.</p> <p>The impact of stress on your mental health can include:</p> <ul> <li>Anxiety</li> <li>Depression</li> <li>Irritability</li> <li>Lack of focus</li> <li>Lack of motivation</li> <li>Burnout <sup><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128009512000443" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">20</a></sup></li> </ul> <p>The mental challenges that result from ongoing stress can be significant, and can affect your work, relationships, and general well-being. If you’ve been experiencing significant stress, it’s important to find ways to change your situation--perhaps by finding a new job or addressing issues in a relationship. Seeing a mental health professional can help, as can finding daily stress management techniques that work for you. </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section3"> <script type="application/ld+json">{"@context":"https://schema.org","@type":"FAQPage","mainEntity":[{"@type":"Question","name":"How Can I Manage Stress?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"Clearly, it’s important to find ways to manage stress in your life. And while stress is inevitable, how we deal with it has major effects on our health and well-being.\n\nStudies show that people who have higher levels of grit and resilience and who believe in their own power to shape their lives have less negative responses to all types of stress.\n\nIn contrast, people who believe that their lives are controlled by forces beyond their control—whether that’s their boss, their family, luck, fate, etc.—experience more harmful consequences when stressed."}}]}</script> <h2>How Can I Manage Stress?</h2> <p>Clearly, it’s important to find ways to manage stress in your life. And while stress is inevitable, how we deal with it has major effects on our health and well-being <sup><a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0022146510383499" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">21</a></sup>.</p> <p>Studies show that people who have higher levels of grit and resilience and who believe in their own power to shape their lives have less negative responses to all types of stress <sup><a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ashley_Shurick/publication/239888983_Responding_to_trauma_and_loss_An_emotion_regulation_perspective/links/00b7d5239dfdd317e3000000.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">16</a></sup>.</p> <p>In contrast, people who believe that their lives are controlled by forces beyond their control—whether that’s their boss, their family, luck, fate, etc.—experience more harmful consequences when stressed <sup><a href="https://headachejournal.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1526-4610.1986.hed2607369.x" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">22</a></sup>.</p> <p>Just as everyone experiences stress differently, everyone has different ways to manage their stress. However, research supports a few common ways to reduce your stress levels—and to cope with the stress you experience in a more positive way.</p> <h3>Call on Friends and Family</h3> <p>You don’t have to go it alone. </p> <p>When you feel stressed, calling on friends and family to support you can be one of the most helpful things you can do. Studies show that people with strong support networks are more resilient against stressful events, experiencing fewer negative effects <sup><a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1979-21196-001" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">23</a>, <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1986-30534-001" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">24</a>, <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/2136433?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">25</a></sup>.</p> <p>When you feel overwhelmed, reach out to your loved ones. </p> <p>Make time for a cup of coffee with a friend you haven’t seen in a while. Ask your spouse to lighten your load for a bit by taking on a few more chores this week. Plan a date night. Take the kids to the park. Call your college roommate. Taking time to be present with and for the people you love is one of the most powerful ways to recharge and stop the stress cycle.</p> <h3>Engage in Self-Care</h3> <p>Stress often comes from trying to fulfill all our obligations to work, family, friends, clubs, and so on. But all that care for other people can come at a cost: your own health. </p> <p>When faced with the stress of a busy life, it’s important to take care of yourself. Think of the airline warning: <i>Put on your own oxygen mask first</i>. </p> <p>Whatever “self-care” means to you, make time for it in your life. </p> <p>Whether that’s getting a massage or taking a long bath, going on a hike or running with your dog, or even just binge-watching a series on Netflix, self-care is what you make of it. No matter what your relaxation method of choice, try to take at least 15 minutes a day to do something just for you. Studies show that engaging in regular self-care improves your ability to cope with stress and lowers its impact on your health <sup><a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-03627-007" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">26</a>, <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-23385-001" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">27</a></sup>.</p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-happy-content-warm-outside-sun-0006.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-happy-content-warm-outside-sun-0006.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-happy-content-warm-outside-sun-0006.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-happy-content-warm-outside-sun-LR-0006.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="woman-happy-content-warm-outside-sun"> </picture> <h3>Practice Mindfulness</h3> <p>There’s a huge body of research supporting the importance of mindfulness for stress management <sup><a href="https://journals.lww.com/practicalpsychiatry/Abstract/2012/07000/Mindfulness_Based_Stress_Reduction,.2.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">28</a>, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022399903005737" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">29</a>, <a href="https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acm.2008.0495" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">30</a>, <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2007-07751-003" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">31</a></sup>. </p> <p>As little as 15 minutes a day of quiet meditation can help reduce your stress level dramatically <sup><a href="https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acm.2008.0495" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">30</a></sup>. Try downloading an app like Headspace or Calm to get started.</p> <p>Have trouble sitting still for long enough to meditate? Movement practices like yoga, qigong, or tai chi may help. You can also try a simple <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/10-reasons-why-walking-is-the-best-exercise" rel="noreferrer">walking exercise</a>: Turn off your podcast or music and instead pay attention to the feeling of the ground under your feet with each step you take. You’ll experience the benefits of mindfulness <i>and</i> get some exercise.</p> <h3>Get More Sleep</h3> <p>Taking time to sleep can feel like the last thing you can afford after a stressful day, but sleep disturbances and stress go hand-in-hand <sup><a href="https://europepmc.org/abstract/med/17173205" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">32</a></sup>. </p> <p>Chronic stress can make it hard to fall asleep, even though you’re always tired <sup><a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2004-18051-014" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">33</a></sup>. On the other hand, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/how-going-keto-can-improve-your-sleep-quality" rel="noreferrer">getting more sleep</a> is linked with improving your ability to cope with stress, breaking the negative spiral <sup><a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-03627-007" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">26</a></sup>. Try to get at least 7 hours most nights, preferably 8. If you’re too stressed to fall asleep, check with your doctor and consider a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/the-most-effective-natural-sleep-aids" rel="noreferrer">natural sleep aid</a> to help.</p> <h3>Exercise</h3> <p>We’ve all heard it: “Exercise improves your <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/exercise-for-mental-health" rel="noreferrer">mental health</a>.” Well, it’s true. Studies show that even light exercise can improve your mood and help lower your risk of stress-related illnesses <sup><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1424736/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">34</a>, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/000291499090032V" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">35</a>, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0002914907022230" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">36</a></sup>.</p> <p>You may feel too tired to exercise if you’re suffering from chronic stress, but even a short walk can help get you back on the path to physical and mental health. Adding cardio, especially in the form of a sport or activity that you enjoy, can amplify your results. </p> <p>Need an easy way to get started with a new exercise routine? Try a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/three-best-commercial-break-exercises-you-can-do/" rel="noreferrer">commercial break</a> fitness routine or <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/27-beginner-bodyweight-exercises-that-get-results" rel="noreferrer">bodyweight exercises</a>.</p> <h3>Eat Right</h3> <p>What you eat affects how you feel—and how you deal with stress. Our gut microbiome has a strong link with mental health, so it’s important to eat properly to support your mind and body alike <sup><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0166223613000088" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">37</a></sup>.</p> <p>Reducing the amount of <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/8-facts-about-sugar-and-depression" rel="noreferrer">refined sugar</a> in your diet, loading up on <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/the-411-on-probiotics-and-the-microbiome" rel="noreferrer">helpful probiotics</a>, and sticking to whole foods instead of processed can support your gut and in turn, improve your ability to cope with stress. </p> <p>Moreover, certain foods can help you feel better almost immediately. <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/keto-chocolate" rel="noreferrer">Dark chocolate</a>, turkey and other foods containing tryptophan, and some dairy products can help release feel-good hormones like serotonin to alleviate your stress in the moment <sup><a href="https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jmi/51/3,4/51_3,4_139/_article/-char/ja/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer">38</a></sup>.</p> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-nature-mointains-sunlight-free-refreshing-0006.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-nature-mointains-sunlight-free-refreshing-0006.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-nature-mointains-sunlight-free-refreshing-0006.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/woman-nature-mointains-sunlight-free-refreshing-LR-0006.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="woman-nature-mointains-sunlight"> </picture> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section id="section4"> <h2>Wrap Up</h2> <p>Stress is an inescapable part of modern life. But stress and health affect each other: constant stress can put you at risk of serious health issues, from anxiety and depression to ulcers, heart disease, and even cancer.</p> <p>To help deal with stress in the moment, be aware of your physical reactions, then focus on your breathing and pulse and picture them slowing.</p> <p>In the long run, practicing mindfulness and self-care (like getting enough sleep and exercise), eating right, and spending time with loved ones will make dramatic differences to your daily life experience.</p> <p>By being aware of your body and taking time to take care of yourself, you can help reduce the negative effects of stress in your life and stay on the path to greater well-being every day.</p> </section> </article>

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