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How To Do An Alternating Reverse Lunge With Perfect Form

Published January 12, 2018
KC Clements

Written By: KC Clements, MS

KC holds a Master of Arts in Gender Politics from New York University

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<script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context":"http://schema.org", "@type":"BlogPosting", "author": { "@type": "Person", "name": "Elisa Silva" }, "publisher": { "@type": "Organization", "name": "Warrior Made", "logo": { "@type": "ImageObject", "url": "https://www.warriormade.com", "image": "https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/media/public/2019/10/Beginner_ALTERNATING_REVERSE_LUNGE.jpg" } }, "headline":"How to Do an Alternating Reverse Lunge with Perfect Form", "datePublished":"2018-01-12", "dateModified": "2019-10-30", "description":"Learn how to Do an Alternating Reverse Lunge with Perfect Form.", "image": "https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/media/public/2019/10/Beginner_ALTERNATING_REVERSE_LUNGE.jpg" } </script> <article> <div> <ul> <li><a href="#section1">Instructions</a></li> <li><a href="#section2">Things to Keep in Mind During This Exercise</a></li> <li><a href="#section3">Conclusion</a></li> </ul> </div> <section> <p>The lunge is a classic move that provides a powerful workout for your lower body. There are many different variations on the lunge that include moving forward or in reverse, as well as walking or standing in place. In this article we’re going to touch on a beginner version of the lunge: the alternating reverse lunge.</p> <p>Alternating reverse lunges are a bodyweight exercise in which you plant one foot on the ground, then step back into a lunge with your opposite leg. They’re an especially great exercise for learning to stabilize your knees by activating your glutes and hamstrings— a tool you’ll need for more advanced versions of this move. Alternating reverse lunges also provide an incredible workout for your glutes, hamstrings, quads, and calves.</p> <p>It’s crucial to get your form on this exercise exactly right in order to advance to some of the more challenging variations. But once you do, you’ll be able to try out the drop lunge— a variation where you cross your lunging leg behind you and perform a lunge. The drop lunge will add core tension to the exercise and help you to strengthen your hips for improved mobility. </p> <p>With the drop lunge under your belt, you can move on to the jump lunge where you perform alternating lunges by jumping back and forth into the lunge position. The jump lunge will add a cardio element to the exercise that gets your blood pumping while also working your glutes and quads even harder.</p> <p>We’ve got some background on alternating reverse lunges now, so let’s learn how to do them perfectly.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section> <section id="section1"> <h2>Instructions:</h2> <ol> <li>In a standing position, set your feet directly underneath your hips and place your hands on your hips.</li> <li>To initiate the movement, hinge your hips forward a little bit and set your weight slightly back on your heels. You should have about 70% of your weight on your heels and 30% on your toes. It should look like this:</li> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-1.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-1.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-1.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-LR-1.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="alt-reverse-lunge-1"> </picture> <li>Putting your weight on your left heel, step backward with your right leg onto the ball of your right foot, and dip your knee down to tap the ground.</li> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-2.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-2.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-2.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-LR-2.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="alt-reverse-lunge-2"> </picture> <li>Return to the starting position by engaging your left glute and lifting your right leg until you’re back to a standing pose.</li> <li>Once you’ve completed the move with the right leg, switch to perform it with the left leg. Keep alternating until you’ve reached the desired number of repetitions.</li> </ol> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section> <section id="section2"> <h2>Things to keep in mind during this exercise:</h2> <ul> <li>Keep your torso forward rather than upright as you return to the starting position. This will help you to place your weight on your front leg rather than your back leg, helping you to engage the glutes even harder. Your torso should be like this:</li> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-3.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-3.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-3.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-LR-3.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="alt-reverse-lunge-3"> </picture> <li>Make sure that your knee always goes in the same direction as your toes, rather than wobbling in or out. If you’re not sure that you’re doing it right, look down at your femur while you’re performing the exercise and make sure it’s in alignment with your toes. Here’s how your knee should be:</li> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-4.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-4.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-4.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-LR-4.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="alt-reverse-lunge-4"> </picture> <li>Inhale as you drop your back leg down, and exhale as you stand up. This will keep your blood pumping throughout the exercise and help you to maintain focus on nailing that perfect form.</li> <li>Your front knee should remain just behind your toes. If you push your knees too far forward, you’ll be working your quads rather than targeting the glutes and hamstrings like we want. Again, it’s useful to remember to keep 70% of your weight on your heel and 30% on your toes. It should look like this:</li> <picture class="lazy-load"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-5.webp" type="image/webp"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-5.jp2" type="image/jpf"> <source data-srcset="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-5.jpg"> <img src="https://d1ghrtdbdq2gkr.cloudfront.net/blog-content/instructionals-content/alt-reverse-lunge-LR-5.jpg" class="img-fluid" alt="alt-reverse-lunge-5"> </picture> <li>Don’t worry if you’re a little wobbly at first. Stick with it, keep your focus on your form, and you’ll build up the strength and stability you need with time.</li> </section> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium mx-auto"> <section> <section id="section3"> <h2>Conclusion:</h2> <p>The alternating reverse lunge is not only a solid lower body workout for your quads, calves, hamstrings, and glutes, but it’s also a great way to learn how to stabilize your knees, an important skill you’ll need for many other exercises. Stick to the perfect form and the instructions we’ve offered here, and you’ll be sure to get the most out of your alternating reverse lunges.</p> <p>Once you’ve mastered the form for the alternating reverse lunge, you’ll be able to graduate to the slightly more challenging drop lunge which will help you to strengthen your hips and improve mobility. </p> <p>Again, from the drop lunge you’ll move on to the jump lunge, a jumping variation of the lunge that will add a cardio element and an extra glute and quad strengthening boost to the classic lunge.</p> <p>Now that you’ve got all the tools and information you need to perform a perfect alternating reverse lunge, go ahead and give it a try in your next workout!</p> <p>If this exercise is too easy, try <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/exercise/perfect-form-drop-lunge/">Drop Lunges</a>.</p> </section> </article>

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