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Baked Salmon Salad

Published August 05, 2019
Kate Sullivan

Written By: Kate Sullivan, MS

Kate holds a MS in Business Psychology and is currently a PHD researcher in Well-Being and Performance Psychology.

baked-salmon-salad
<article itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Recipe"> <section itemprop="description"> <p>Salad is a staple when you’re eating low carb—it’s healthy, filling, and incredibly versatile. You can have a light side salad or a hearty main dish. It all depends on what proteins you add, the toppings you crave, and which dressing you choose!</p> <p>This heart-healthy salmon salad is loaded with fresh, flavorful ingredients like arugula, dill, and garlic. Plus, it’s fast and easy to make—perfect for a weeknight dinner when you’re just too tired to cook anything overly complicated.</p> </section> <section> <header>Is All Salmon the Same?</header> <p>Salmon is salmon, right? Wrong! Not only are there several varieties of this popular fish, there are differences between farmed and wild-caught salmon, especially when it comes to sustainability and health.</p> <div class="sub-head">Atlantic vs. Pacific Salmon</div> <p>The two main kinds of salmon are Atlantic and Pacific—obviously, named for where they tend to live! Most Atlantic salmon we have access to is farm-raised. There are US-based farms on the coasts, but most Atlantic salmon is raised in Chile or Norway.</p> <p>In contrast, Pacific salmon can be farmed or caught in the wild. There are several species, including pink salmon, sockeye (or red) salmon, and king (or chinook) salmon. They’re all darned tasty—and good for you, too! Salmon has tons of omega-3 fatty acids, which are proven to benefit heart health, reduce inflammation, and more.</p> <div class="sub-head">Which Is Better, Farmed or Wild Salmon?</div> <p>The real difference in types of salmon comes down to farmed or wild. In order to grow as big as possible as fast as possible, farmed salmon are fed a diet of pellets that may include antibiotics, added fats, and other ingredients you would otherwise try to stay away from. These additives also mean that farmed salmon is often higher in calories than its wild cousin—412 calories per serving for farmed vs. 281 for wild.</p> <p>Salmon farms may also contribute to pollution through chemicals that spread into waters beyond the farm pens. However, many aquaculture companies are turning to healthier, more sustainable practices, such as eliminating antibiotics, using sustainably sourced krill to feed the fish, and filtering their water flow. This makes farmed Atlantic salmon, especially that from the US and Norway, a reasonable budget option.</p> <p>Wild salmon may be an even better choice, though. Hailing from the Pacific, these salmon eat a natural diet of krill and other small sea creatures. They’re relatively low in mercury because of that lower position on the food chain. Plus, they’re high in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and have more calcium, iron, potassium, and zinc than farmed salmon. Better still, there’s no risk of antibiotics being added to their food source <i>and</i> there’s no pollution or runoff from their habitat!</p> <p>The only catch is that wild salmon takes more time and effort to harvest, so prices can be high—up to $16 per pound.</p> <div class="sub-head">How To Choose Sustainable Salmon</div> <p>When shopping for salmon, your best bet is to head to a local fish market instead of a big chain grocery. These smaller shops specialize in fish, so they’re usually more knowledgeable about the products they sell. Get to know what’s available in your area. You may find that one of your local chains has a specialty fish counter staffed by savvy fishmongers who can answer your questions about where that salmon filet came from! Stores are getting smart, and more grocers are including this feature due to consumer demands.</p> <p>It’s worth pointing out that even <a target="_blank" href="https://www.warriormade.com/content/diet/keto-on-a-budget" rel="noreferrer">discount groceries</a> are now keeping up on sustainability. For instance, Aldi sells pre-packaged salmon at very competitive prices, and clearly labels it with the country of origin and whether it was sustainably wild-caught.</p> <p>Wherever you shop, ask whether the salmon you’re looking at was sustainably sourced. If they can’t answer, opt instead for a certified sustainable canned salmon with the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.msc.org/" rel="noreferrer">Marine Stewardship Council</a> seal of approval. It won’t be quite as flavor-packed as the crusted baked salmon we make in this recipe, but it’ll still give you plenty of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and be a good environmental choice.</p> </section> <section> <header>Why Is Arugula So Popular?</header> <p>Peppery and pungent, arugula is a great addition to a snazzy salad. But does it offer any health benefits beyond the usual “eat your leafy greens” advice?</p> <p>Absolutely! Also known as <i>rocket</i>, this salad green is more closely related to broccoli and kale than to lettuce. It packs a load of nutrients in its delicate leaves, including high levels of antioxidants. It has loads of calcium for strong bones, vitamin C for immune support, potassium for better nerve function, and vitamin A for eye health. </p> <p>Plus, its high levels of nitrates may <a target="_blank" href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40279-014-0149-y" rel="noreferrer">improve your athletic performance</a> and help lower your blood pressure. Arugula may even help <a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4065051/" rel="noreferrer">fight cancer</a>.</p> </section> <hr class="divider-15 divider-thick mx-auto"> <section class="recipe"> <header itemprop="name">Baked Salmon Salad</header> <div class="prep"> <span> <meta itemprop="prepTime" content="PT15M">Prep Time: 10 minutes</span> <span> <meta itemprop="cookTime" content="PT35M">Cooking Time: 15 minutes</span> <span> <meta itemprop="recipeYield">Serves: 4</span> </div> <div class="sub-head">Ingredients:</div> <p><i>For the Salmon</i></p> <ul class="ingredients no-bullet"> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">1 (2-pound) salmon filet </li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">3 cloves garlic, finely minced</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac14; cup fresh parsley, chopped</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac12; cup grated Parmesan cheese</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac14; teaspoon black pepper</li> </ul> <p><i>For the Salad</i></p> <ul class="ingredients no-bullet"> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac34; cup full-fat Greek yogurt</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac12; cup fresh dill, finely chopped</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">1 lemon, juiced and zested (about 2 tablespoons of juice and 1 teaspoon zest)</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac14; teaspoon salt</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">4 cups arugula</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">2 cups baby spinach</li> <li itemprop="recipeIngredient">&frac12; cup red onion, sliced (about 1 medium-sized onion)</li> </ul> <hr class="divider-50 divider-medium"> <div class="sub-head">Instructions:</div> <ol itemprop="recipeInstructions"> <li>Preheat oven to 425&deg;F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or aluminum foil.</li> <li>Place the salmon, skin side down, onto the prepared baking sheet. Cover with a piece of parchment or foil, then bake for 10 minutes.</li> <li>In a small bowl, mix together the garlic, parsley, Parmesan, and pepper.</li> <li>Remove the salmon from the oven and discard the top piece of parchment. Top the fish with the Parmesan mixture, pressing down with the back of a spoon to make a solid crust.</li> <li>Return the fish to the oven and bake for another 5 minutes, uncovered, until the crust is golden and the fish flakes easily with a fork (the internal temperature should be around 135&deg;F).</li> <li>Remove from the oven and allow to rest while you prep the salad and dressing.</li> <li>In a small bowl, whisk together the yogurt, dill, lemon juice and zest, and salt.</li> <li>Divide the greens and sliced onion between 4 serving plates. Top with &frac14; of the salmon, then drizzle with &frac14; of the dressing. </li> </ol> </section> </article>
Nutrition Facts

Serves 1


Calories

416


Amount Per Serving

Total Fat

17.5g

Sodium

660mg

Carbohydrate

8g

Sugar

3g

Dietary Fiber

1g

Protein

54g


Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Serves 1


Calories

416


Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Amount Per Serving

Total Fat

17.5g

Sodium

660mg

Carbohydrate

8g

Sugar

3g

Dietary Fiber

1g

Protein

54g

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